A Woman’s Place is in The Mall

Hanky Panky sponsored an event this week at the American Folk Art Museum to promote efforts to create a National Women’s History Museum  at the National Mall in Washington D.C.

Hanky Panky sponsored an event at the American Folk Art Museum to promote efforts to create a National Women’s History Museum

In honor of Women’s History Month, Hanky Panky sponsored an event this week at the American Folk Art Museum to promote efforts to create a National Women’s History Museum  at the National Mall in Washington D.C.

Representative Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) breezed in to speak about what a great role such a museum would play in telling the real history of America—a history of important, but too often unacknowledged, contributions by women.

Joan Bradley Wages, President & CEO of the National Women’s History Museum (left). Representative Carolyn Maloney (right). Rep. Maloney noted that Lida Orzeck and Gale Epstein, Hanky Panky’s co-founders, made their own contribution to women’s history when, having hit the glass ceiling, they went out and started their own business to do what they loved. (Photo courtesy of the National Women’s History Museum)

Joan Bradley Wages, President & CEO of the National Women’s History Museum (left). Representative Carolyn Maloney (right). Rep. Maloney noted that Lida Orzeck and Gale Epstein, Hanky Panky’s co-founders, made their own contribution to women’s history when, having hit the glass ceiling, they went out and started their own business to do what they loved. (Photo courtesy of the National Women’s History Museum)

It helps to understand Rep. Maloney’s passion for a National Women’s History Museum if you know of Paul Revere (“The British are coming, the British are coming!”), but have never heard of Sybil Ludington, who in 1777, at 16 years old rode twice as far as Revere on a stormy night to gather militiamen in Putnam County to her father’s farmhouse to fight  the British advancing from Danbury, Connecticut. Or how would you know that Catherine Littlefield Greene was instrumental in the invention of the cotton gin, but since women could not hold patents, Eli Whitney gets all the credit in history books, even though Greene financed it?

Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art, on view at the National Folk Art Museum through April 23, 2014, features thirteen ensembles by “established and emerging designers” who were inspired by works in the Folk Art Museum’s collection.

Porcupine by Jean Yu

Porcupine by Jean Yu

Coat by Gary Graham, inspired by a 19th Century Coverlet

Coat by Gary Graham, inspired by a 19th Century Coverlet

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square
(Columbus Avenue at 66th Street)
New York, NY 10023-6214

Hours:
Tuesday–Saturday: noon – 7:30 pm
Sunday: noon – 6:00 pm
Monday: closed

Admission is free.

For more information on the National Women’s History Museum, and how you can support, see www.nwhm.org.

-Clara

 

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About Hanky Panky

Over 30 years ago, in 1977, designer Gale Epstein created a hand-made lingerie set for her friend, Lida Orzeck, crafted out of embroidered handkerchiefs. The original designs were the inspiration for the company name, Hanky Panky. Blending traditional with modern glam looks, Hanky Panky is a fashion favorite of countless celebrities.
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